January 3, 2017

January 3: Little red wagon

More about the 20 Days of Chill over here

I wrote a little piece of fiction very quickly so ignore any errors : Little Blue

There was a putrid scent in the air that had lingered ever since the tire company closed its factory some ten years ago. Little Blue grew up in this small town with the population of 107 and had never once not thought about leaving. The town itself was full of shades of gray. It had once been a colorful place but the colors muted overtime and no one minded to repaint. Little hardly paid attention to her surrounding. The town was too dull for her.

She was named Little because of her small weight at birth but she grew tall and wide. By the time she was eighteen, her father had to made their front door wider to accommodate her growth. Now in the last of her twenties, Little began to hate her name.

Out of the blue, a man in black arrived in his red wagon. He stepped out, all dressed in black and looked like an overly expensive car. But there was a look to his face - something that resembles a sort of knot that needed to be untie - his eyebrows knitted, his nose twitched and his lips twisted in a way that suggested they too might just knot themselves. But when he smiled which was quite often, he was a perfect picture of beauty. Little was immediately smitten with him. 

Not surprisingly, his name was Hansen Black. Black became Little's favorite color. She made a little tattoo of a tiny black heart on her left arm using a black marker as the town had no tattoo parlors.

Red was the color the town began to turn. Business began to close and people began to move away. If a business didn't close, there were red paint all over the walls of those business - threats that muddled together as the paint dried. Hansen Black was seen at those places but there was no evidence of his involvement. The townsfolk began to whisper that he used black magic but Little didn't care. She followed him everywhere in secret though she sometimes suspected he noticed her but every time he turned and she was in full view, he appeared not to have seen her.

Weeks passed until all the business closed and all that was left was the town's cafe where the owner - an ancient lady - stood about in her carefree style. She was undeterred by it all. But Hansen Black had his ways. Little witnessed that much. Just a few words from him and the ancient lady was frightened enough to ushered everyone out of the cafe and closed the place.

The town was soon deserted. All but Little's family stayed. She had two younger brothers and one baby sister. Her father, Henry Blue, was a farmer on his own soil. He refused to leave. The Blue family woke each morning to half dried red paint all over the white fences and even in the field where the tomatoes and the lettuces and every vegetable and fruit around were covered in red paint. But Little's father insisted on staying.

Then there came threats - notes nailed to the front porch - each one more threatening than the last - all written in red ink. Hansen Black was seen once in a while standing around near their property and watching, only to leave a moment later in his red wagon.

Little began to dislike Hansen Black. She knew he was there to take over the town but she had hoped that he would be staying but upon listening in on one of his phone conversations, he was not staying after all. He was only there to buy the place through whatever methods he saw fit and then sell it to the highest bidder.

One day, Henry Blue was face to face with Hansen Black in their front yard. Hansen Black was there for one last chat with her father. Little and her siblings were inside the house watching through the windows.

Hansen Black and Henry Blue stood facing each other for a long while but then Hansen Black threw a hand in the air and Henry Blue fell backward.

Little raced out of the house. Her father was dead. She looked up at Hansen Black and a hatred grew. She wished Hansen Black never came to their town and in an instant black confetti were falling from the sky and Hansen Black was gone but his red wagon was still around.

Little buried her father but she had no idea what to do. After some time, new people began to move into town. Fresh paint was everywhere, new houses were built, new business began to popped up and there was no mentioned of Hansen Black.

Little sold the red wagon and used the money to restore her house and the field. Little knew the town was no longer the same and she was no longer just a girl in a small town.

Thank you for reading. To visit other bloggers participating in the 20 days of chill, go here.

10 comments:

  1. The little red wagon and the deserted town reminded me of the Disney Cars movie. Radiator Springs, the town in the movie, used to be a lively place but kind of went extinct after the new Interstate was built.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've not seen Cars but I do remember seeing a red cartoon car with eyes and mouth - cute!

      thanks for stopping by, have a lovely day.

      Delete
  2. nice that you are writing in the New Year!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think so too, I really do need to keep writing and also editing too.

      thanks for stopping by, have a lovely day.

      Delete
  3. The beauty of this challenge is to see people get their fictional shoes on, as well. I enjoyed this read. The ending was a little something ... but well done!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. this one was written quickly so I'm not sure why I ended it that way only that, I seem write a lot of open-ended beginnings and the end for this story is like a beginning.

      thanks for stopping by, have a lovely day.

      Delete
  4. That was an interesting story and a good use of the prompt. Mr. Black is gone and justice was served courtesy of Little. I can see that she will no longer be the same.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. my first idea was entirely different from this story but I do like this a whole lot.

      thanks for stopping by, have a lovely day.

      Delete
  5. Very interesting take on the theme. Not what I was expecting at all. Well done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. it's not what I had expected either because I wasn't writing this when I thought on the theme and then it somehow became this.

      thanks for stopping by, have a lovely day.

      Delete

"To practice any art, no matter how well or badly, is a way to make your soul grow. So do it." -- Kurt Vonnegut

This blog is powered by Blogger, fairytales, sleeping princes, moon cakes, express trains, faraway friends, a lost memory, a princess dragon, cold weather, the color mint, friendly giants, and the rain. Thank you for visiting & have a lovely day.